What Happens to an Egg After Two Days in Vinegar

This is a cool experiment to try at home. Did you know you could make rubber eggs???

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46 Responses to What Happens to an Egg After Two Days in Vinegar

  1. Bichon gard says:

    This looks like fun! A shop toy for the boys to play with. Thanks!

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  2. Chris Hawk says:

    Vinegar eats Calcium and calcium is what the shell is when the opportunity it your bursting the skin of the Egg

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    • Chatt says:

      Im curious Mr. Hawk, what if a person consume too much vinegar (like vinegar in salads, vinegar in pastas and spaghetti or vinegar in almost all food eaten) does it affect the calcium in ones body?

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      • Jean W. says:

        I think the calcium in the body won’t be affected since it’s not directly exposed to vinegar like this egg.

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  3. The shell is permeable allows air to go through and some moisture so the vinegar would eventually soak through into the egg and fill it up.it would be like a balloon filled with water.

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  4. I put the egg in vinger.When Im done can the egg be eaten?I am not going to eat it, just wanted o know.

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    • angelo says:

      dont eat it

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    • J Burr says:

      Pickled eggs have been a favorite dish in America for many years. You will see them sold in bars quite often. They are usually in large gallon jars filled with a vinegar brine with a large amount of hot sauce added. The eggs are generally left for much more than two days and they are like hard boiled eggs with a vinegar/hot sauce flavor. Most people assume they were cooked and peeled but they were just raw eggs left to pickle. Yummy…

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  5. Sounds like fun to try some of these things.

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  6. The egg will do the same thing if it is soaked in coke. Think what it does to our stomach. Also if you take a penny that is color dirty and put hot sause on it. The hot sause will clean the penny like it was new. Again think what it will do to your stomach.

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    • Robbie says:

      Nothing would happen to your stomach! We have in our stomach HCL acid which is much stronger than vinegar and coke. However, if you have very large amounts of vinegar and coke, eventually it would burn going down the oesophagus, much like heartburn, but that would be a lot of coke!

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    • J Burr says:

      Thankfully our stomachs are not made of copper or eggshell. They can handle hot sauce and coke and even vinegar quite easily.

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    • BG says:

      Good thing our stomachs aren’t lined with coke, hot sauce or vinegar.

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  7. Mark says:

    Why would you pour the vinegar into a 2nd jar only to transfer to the 1st jar containing the egg? Are you forbidden from pouring vinegar into the 1st jar directly? (Very Odd)

    Liked by 2 people

  8. mitch pierce says:

    the egg is permeable, but has a protective membrane, witch the vinegar, when joined with it, made it stronger, like rubber, that membrane, is also what give it a long shelve life in the refrig.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. sara says:

    Interesting! 💖

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  10. sara says:

    INTERESTING!

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  11. I did this experiment a couple of times when i was younger and the egg allways broke but the egg was white wondering was that the reason it broke

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  12. Wil Schiffers says:

    Why pour the vinegar first in an empty jar and then in the jar with the egg????

    Liked by 1 person

  13. robert says:

    it cooked the skin under the shell, we get soft shell eggs like that but they will not bounce , its laid like that …………..!

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  14. Guy Shaw says:

    Eggs contain something called “calcium carbonate”. This is what makes them hard. Vinegar is an acid known as acetic acid. When calcium carbonate (the egg) and acetic acid (the vinegar) combine, a chemical reaction takes place and carbon dioxide (a gas) is released. This is what the bubbles are made of. The chemical reaction keeps happening until all of the carbon in the egg is used up — it takes about a day. When you take the egg out of the vinegar it’s soft because all of the carbon floated out of the egg in those little bubbles. Since the egg shell is made out of “calcium carbonate” and is “eaten” up by the acidic vinegar. Then leaving behind only the inner membrane and giving the egg a rubbery feeling. The egg shell is almost completely see-through and squishy.
    Immediately after we place the raw egg in the vinegar, bubbles start to form around it. After 24 hours the shell will be gone and portions of it will be floating on the surface. The egg remains intact because of the thin see-through membrane that is normally between the shell and the egg white. Also, the size of the egg has slightly increased.
    This is what takes place in the transformation of the egg. To the best of my knowledge.

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  15. Michael Conley says:

    Nice way to pass the time on a cold day or night. Later see how much you can bounce the egg before it “cracks?” All-in-all this looks
    like fun. 🙂

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  16. Andrea says:

    Was the egg hard boiled before putting into the jar?

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  17. Sabina says:

    “… mersit ac liquefactum absorbuit”….. even Kleopatra knew that vinegar is dissolving chalk 🙂

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  18. Stuff I should have learnedn science class years ago. Pretty neat now!

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  19. Connie Maden says:

    When you submerge an egg in vinegar, the shell dissolves. Vinegar contains acetic acid, which breaks apart the solid calcium carbonate crystals that make up the eggshell into their calcium and carbonate parts. The calcium ions float free (calcium ions are atoms that are missing electrons), while the carbonate goes to make carbon dioxide—the bubbles that you see.

    http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/eggs/activity-naked.html

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  20. Pretty interesting didn’t see that coming will have to try. Aloha

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  21. simon lui says:

    There are lot medicinal of vineger, break the shell mix with the vinegar can help people stroke, also can cosmetology, only vinegar can help spurs.

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  22. Laura says:

    The shell of a egg is calcium carbonate. Vinegar is acetic acid. The calcium carbonate reacts with with the vinegar. The bouncy part is the membrane from inside the shell because the acid of the vinegar disolves the shell leaving the egg feeling like rubber.

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  23. 2CH3COOH + CaCO3 → H2O + CO2 + Ca(CH3COO)2

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  24. Dulcee says:

    Vinegar is an acid called acetic acid – CH3COOH – and white vinegar from the grocery store is usually about 5% acetic acid and 95% water. Egg shells are made up of calcium carbonate. The vinegar reacts with the calcium carbonate by breaking the chemical into its calcium and carbonate parts (in simplest terms). The calcium part floats around in the solution while the carbonate part reacts to form the carbon dioxide bubbles that you see. You should actually change the vinegar after 2 days then put fresh vinegar in the jar and leave it set for another week.

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  25. Hmmmm egg and vinegar. That sounds like one hell of a hangover cure. 🙂

    http://lordsofthedrinks.com/the-hangover-cures-dossier/

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  26. Anonymous says:

    lame!!!

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  27. Plamen Vladimirov says:

    By the way if you eath thath egg you will put your bloodpresuer down….that is fact…..but the egg must stay into a vinegar only 24 hours ….no 2 days……ONLY 24hours……. If you not believe look for bulgarian site of Dr.Mermerski….. Be health…. 🙂

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  28. After playing with the bouncy egg you broke it now, after breaking the egg would it be safe to eat?

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  29. After completing this experiment you broke the egg and it looked normal. Now saying this would it be harmful to eat the egg or not?

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  30. AnnHelen says:

    Interesting !!
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    kainatjamil.wordpress.com

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Matthew Osman says:

    Can you eat that egg if it was in that vinger jar for About 2 days?

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  32. PULH4 says:

    Thanks for the heads up, but I know this shit since 1990…

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  33. Don says:

    Acetic acid( vinegar) dissolves the calcium carbonate that makes up the majority of the shell. (there’s some phosphorous, also). As the vinegar reaches the thin membrane under the shell, some passes through the membrane and starts to ” denature” or chemically change the ALBUMIN, or egg white. ALBUMIN is a protein, and vinegar, or any acid for that matter, will act on it to turn it into some other substance, which in this case is the ” rubber”y egg white. The yolk, having sulfur and other elements, isn’t quite as affected, but it does change somewhat.

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  34. Morgane says:

    Was you egg boiled

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