Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guard Puts Crowd in Their Place

“It is requested that everyone maintains a level of silence and respect”,says the soldier as he stops in stance and demands silence from a disrespectful crowd.

You could hear a penny drop after that…

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

47 Responses to Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guard Puts Crowd in Their Place

  1. Raymond Parra says:

    I have visited This Sacred Tomb of The Unknown Soldier, it is fitting for what it represents. Silence is almost automatic for visitors, I think even the birds flying overhead remain silent. The Soldiers are immaculate and precise, one cannot help or hold back your emotions.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. ladydee82955 says:

    I honestly never associated silence in an outdoor, tourist venue with respect. In a church, during a sermon, perhaps. At the table when someone is offering a blessing, yes. When someone else is giving a speech, performing a song or poem, of course. But whomever the soldier is in that tomb, he/she died to protect our freedom. I don’t see talking, laughing, or even taking pictures to be disrespectful after a person has driven, or flown, miles and miles and miles to visit that tomb. I think the respect is in the effort itself.

    Like

    • bobfrommosinee says:

      There are places where silence and respect are automatic, Where those who have died for the Country, Known but to God, Is one of them, They gave all for no recognition, Lost to History, They deserve that Respect and Reverent Silence for their sacrifice.

      Like

    • Glenda says:

      Really???? its not a place to party no matter how many miles and miles and miles, its called respect. pretty obvious you have none

      Like

    • Phillip says:

      You have a right to your opinion. I can only say… Visit Arlington. There are signs everywhere reminding “Silence as an example of Reverence”. The signs are not a request, they are a demand. They have no concerts in cemeteries. The cemetery is not a gathering area closely associated to a bar or restaurant for socialization, it is where the dead sleep.

      Like

    • jean shauger says:

      i don know what religion you are but Christians.. know Jesus wept when a person died.. and so manty soldiers have died in agony or when the enemy got them were tortured.. war is Hell.. HEll.. and it is known by many they sleep and not to disturb them.. sometimes the soldier spirits have appeared and think there is still a war or they havent gone to the peaceful state.. where wars are sometimes there is a lot of negativity from all the pain and suffering.. soldiers who fight in wars never are the same when they come back and families too suffe.. I think that this is good.. that they never be forgotten.. they died for our freedoms what we have.. I for one say May God deliever them to a peaceful realm or may they sleep ..I pray God Bless and forgive any and thank you..AMen

      Like

    • ed says:

      Then you should probably stay away. That “unknown” person died for your freedom. If silence is asked to show that respect then it should be heeded.

      Like

    • Condra Scott says:

      This is not just a tourist venue. This is a gravesite, commemorating those unidentified soldiers that lost their lives in war. Would you go to a family member’s grave laughing and joking around? Probably not. More likely you would be quiet, thoughtful, and reflect on what they meant to you. That soldier is asking people to maintain the respect that all those who gave their lives for yours deserve.

      In addition, if flying or driving “miles and miles” to visit that tomb is respect in your mind, please just stay home.

      Like

    • Kevin (ffd263) says:

      I have to disagree with you ladydee…..this soldier standing guard is delivering a “sermon” he speaks volumes towards the life and death of these unknown soldiers……this is not now and never will be a tourist venue….this is sacred to all the freedoms that we hold ……as far as you mentioning someone getting respect with silence for performing a song or poem, this action and duty of this soldier far surpasses anything remotely “entertaining”. Disney is for tourists….the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is a place of reverence and should be a silent , respectful, time to reflect on the freedoms afforded us every day by the ultimate sacrifice that the men and woman of this Nation so thanklessly and unselfishly have afforded us lucky ones.

      Like

  3. Well that’s one way to remind tourists to stop acting like tourists. 😀

    Like

  4. I totally disagree. I can’t imagine how anyone could talk or laugh at such a solemn place. Respect should be shown – this is not a sideshow or performing clowns where people are expected to clap or laugh to show that they are enjoying what us going on.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Guest says:

    And ……… ladydee82955’s comment is EXACTLY what the problem is these days…. It’s ALWAYS about what THEY think their rights are!!
    It’s NOT a circus!!! Its NOT disneyland!!!! It’s the Sacred Tomb of the Unknown Soldier! A place of reflection, quiet thought! Geez, even 5th grade children didn’t have to be told to be quiet and respectful!!!

    Like

    • ladydee82955 says:

      THEY????? Hm…….I guess I can tell by that which side of the world of debate you are on. Talking amongst yourselves, laughing, or whatever…that does not constitute a circus, nor Disneyland, nor disrespect for that matter. Now, if they were throwing garbage on the site, or cigarette butts…or yelling at other people for not believing or acting the way THEY do, then yes, that would be disrespectful. But I can’t think of any better way to honor those who died for the freedom of ALL of us, than to be able to talk and laugh freely. At least those people were getting along.

      Like

      • dan says:

        Its just a courtesy you give to honor the soldier. That’s the way we do it down here in the south same as when a funeral procession drives by we pull over in respect to the dead. We teach our kids to show respect when it is due. If you don’t realize what this soldier gave and all the other fallen soldiers gave and you can’t give them a moment of silence then why do you expect someone else to respect your opinion. Just sayin

        Like

      • Chris says:

        Wow, you’re an idiot. You do realize that this is still a cemetery, right? And that particular spot in what you refer to as “a tourist venue” is considered pretty sacred, hence why they have a guard posted there 24/7, walking back and forth. Heaven forbid people take a few minutes out of their day to actually sit and think about what and who is sacrificed so that they can enjoy the freedoms that this soldier gave his life for. You can laugh freely and talk all you want after you leave this particular spot. But there is a level of respect that is to be shown for that particular tomb.

        Like

  6. Johnette says:

    Guest @6:32 am, you nailed it! It’s got nothing to do with how far one may have driven, flown or crawled to be there. It’s about having enough respect for that unnamed soldier who gave his very life in order that we might all keep the freedoms that we all have today. It is this unknown man’s GRAVESITE, for heaven’s sake! Doesn’t matter who you think you are or how you got there. That man died to save your life and your freedom. It’s something we should all take personal, and act with the dignity and respect that unknown soldier deserves.

    ladydee82955, how would you like it if the next time you have a close family member die, I bring some friends and we have a loud party in the middle of your family member’s funeral? That’s about the same level of disrespect that these ‘tourists’ were showing. And the further I have to drive, the louder and rowdier I’ll get. That sound alright with you, ladydee82955?

    Like

    • ladydee82955 says:

      First of all, Johnette, the tomb is not a funeral every day….it is a tourist attraction in it’s own right and almost everyone visiting it pays for it’s upkeep and security. I do not disagree with the seriousness of remembering why that soldier, and all the others died. I just believe they died so that NOBODY could DEMAND the public to be quiet and to act as everyone else is acting. So long as the people are not breaking any laws, like destroying the tomb and surrounding grounds, they are in no way being disrespectful by feeling free to speak or laugh as they wish.
      However, if you and yours would like to attend the funeral of my next relative to depart this world, I’ll contact you when the time comes, and we can make one huge party of it, celebrating my relative’s life and ability to live in freedom. I believe they would all love the idea that so many were remembering the happiness in their lives. Makes as much sense, if not more, as people putting balloons, windchimes, plastic flowers and toys on graves, as they do now. Everyone looks at death in different ways……talking or laughing is not a matter of disrespect. Assuming that ANYONE has the authority to DEMAND silence at a site maintained by tax funds PAID by those who are talking or laughing….THAT is disrespect, and totally against what that soldier died fighting for. However, everyone to their own opinion, even if you’re wrong. lol
      I’ve said enough on the subject.

      Happy Thanksgiving everyone! Remember to add “Freedom” to the list of things you’re thankful for.

      Like

  7. ladydee82955 says:

    And, excuse me….but was there a true ceremony going on? Or are all the visitors EXPECTED to just SILENTLY stand there and “reflect”, and then leave. I mean, I don’t even see people being silent in grave yards, or in churches before and after the sermon. So, did I miss something here? Was there a ceremony in progress, like the changing of the guard, or was it just another day of visitors coming to see the park and all peoples are expected to be silent the whole day?

    Like

    • pegritchie says:

      What is this, junior high school? That soldier is there to guard the sanctity and solemn dignity of the tomb of the unknown soldier, who represents the millions of lives given in the line of duty to the preservation of democracy and the freedom you experience living in this country. So yes, it is a kind of ceremony. Call me a patriot, but if I’m there and you’re there, you’d best be having a solemn, grateful moment.

      Like

    • brad says:

      Ladydee,
      While i appriciate your having a thought of your own in this regard you are way off… when you visit the grave of a loved one do you sit or stand there and have a good loud time? If you do speak its probably in a low voice. Now if it were only one family at the tomb with say explaining to a child what the place is about im sure it would be fine but when there are a couple hundred people even a low voice ftom everyone becomes very loud. If you think its unreasonable for the men giving their time to watch over the memorial to ask for silence then please feel free not to visit such places because there are places that have earned the right for silent and solumn behavior. Men and women who they gave their lives to protect our freedoms have that right…. you want to talk while you are there then wslk up say “thank you” and walk away.

      Like

    • Somebody else says:

      And nobody needs a whiney twit…yet here you are.

      Like

    • Shelly Clive says:

      Yes this is the changing of the guard. It’s standard practice to request this level of respect during the changing of the guard ceremony. There’s countless videos out there of guards requesting silence from the crowd or yelling at people crossing the rails.
      The solders who perform this duty take it very seriously and they request a level behaviour they equate with respect. It’s okay that you don’t see it as disrespectful to talk, at the same time those actually involved do and that’s reason enough to remain quite during the ceremony.

      Like

    • Robert Alton says:

      I believe you have the right to think as you do and behave as you do, for it is your right. Thankfully you have those “Rights”, for many thousands of people fought and died for it, selflessly, in many brutal and violently painful ways. Anonymously and without recognition. This is their tomb. And for the families of these fallen, many of these soldiers are simply gone, missing, forever vanished. I believe, as many do, this tomb and what it stands for has less to do with what you want to believe. It is not and should not simply be a free-for-all tourist attraction. It is not about respecting tourist’s rights and freedom to do and act as they, it is about respecting the anonymous fallen soldier(s) and the many thousands of family that miss them every day and visit this tomb. The realities of your selfish world, this tomb would be vandalized and desecrated if it wasn’t guarded as it is. As for yourself assuming all is fine in the world, because it was after all, OTHERS that die, not you or someone you know and love…
      As for your judgement of the man at arms, blindly judging based on your assumptions of what was occurring BEHIND the camera and out of YOUR view is NOT acceptable! You, sitting in front of your computer watching videos, basing judgment upon this guard’s response within a very short 55 second clip. Not even one minute long… and you seem to know everything. How do you know what was going on behind the camera to sit there and judge the Guard’s response? Attitudes and disrespectful behaviours that were clearly seen and felt by the guard, enough so that he broke his own silence! Do you actually understand it means to that guard to break his own silence? He is not an actor, he is not their to entertain, he is not their for your amusement.
      For me, his guard’s action speaks volumes about what he was seeing, hearing and most importantly, feeling. Feeling, there’s a concept. The feeling of being disrespected, your tomb in which you are proud to be tasked to guard, being disrespected. Personally I think you should stick to commenting moron cat videos and less on judging actual military personnel guarding the tomb of their own fallen. It is after all their tomb we are visiting, their tomb they are guarding. It’s their tomb that was being disrespected. We are their as guests and we should be respectfully mindful of that. It may draw tourists but tourist’s rights are not the point of this tomb.
      Your judgement is flawed and based on blind assumption, not reality. A 55 second clip and YOU seem to know what’s going on… For you, it’s obviously more about rights and the right to misbehave than being respectful of others. A selfish world we’ve become. Respect is in the eye’s of the receiver, not the giver.
      Speaking of how assumptions can work, I can assume you’re the sort of person that can sit in a funeral, in the front and then spend the whole time playing with your phone, texting away and taking videos (so you can post them later)… “but quietly”, because after all, you think you’re being respectful… and I agree with you, it is completely within your right to behave or misbehave (it’s a free Country) and who are we to judge… you.

      Like

    • Phillip says:

      You really do not know anything about the tomb of the Unknown Soldier…. do you. There are signs politely requesting silence “meaning shut the hell up”.

      Like

    • 45 RPM says:

      To answer your question “Was there a ceremony in progress?” Yes, there was. It is one long continuous ceremony that never stops. How about when you are at a funeral for one of your dear friends or family members and someone was there being rude and disrespectful. Would you appreciate it?

      Like

    • former soldier says:

      You must be part of the ‘ME’ generation, because there is a ceremony going on. The soldier guarding the tomb is performing it. He takes exactly 21 steps , then stops pauses 21 seconds, does an about face.takes 21 steps and continues all throughout his shift. The guard is not allowed to drink or use profanity for the rest of his life. It is considered the highest honor a soldier can have. If you know anyone that has been in the military, ask them if there should be silence while visiting the tomb. By the way, the 21 steps and the 21 second pause is the same as a 21 gun salute for a fallen hero. That soldier gave his life for his country so why shouldn’t he have the respect he deserves

      Like

    • Kelly Byers says:

      http://www.arlingtoncemetery.mil/Explore-the-Cemetery/Changing-of-the-Guard

      Yes, ma’am, there is definitely a “true ceremony” taking place here. Every minute. Of every hour. Of every day. In the boiling sun of summer. In the pouring rain of spring. And in the freezing ice and snow of harsh winters. Since you asked, please read about what you’ve missed in the link above to be informed. If you’re short on time, here’s a line from paragraph #2:
      The relief commander walks out to the Tomb and salutes, then faces the spectators and asks them to stand and stay silent during the ceremony.
      If you ever get the chance, an in person visit might help you understand better. Maybe.

      Like

  8. Respect to this soldier. Although in other cultures it’s pretty normal to have a drink and a chat with the dead loved ones. Like here in Peru: http://lordsofthedrinks.com/2013/07/28/having-a-cheers-with-dead-loved-ones/

    Liked by 1 person

  9. SGT. Otis Thomas says:

    Ladydee82955…..you are very disrespectful in saying what you have said. Every place you go in the world has rules. This is a sacred place and the rule is silence when at the tomb! Do you talk when you’re at an event and a moment of silence is requested in honor of the fallen Soldiers? No, you are the one who will not be silent or bow your head. I assume this because of the ignorant statement and replies you have made.

    Like

  10. HonorThoseWhoHaveServed says:

    @Ladydee82955 – Um, yes, there was a solemn, meaningful, tremendously important ceremony going on. It is the symbolic and literal act of watching over and honoring ALL those who have served our nation, too many of whom have made the ultimate sacrifice in doing so, some who never come home to their families even for burial. This soldier guarding the tomb applied for and was awarded the honor of performing this ceremony, and trained to do it in a fitting and respectful manner. Those who have earned this honor carry out this duty 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, through any and all weather. They get it. Apparently, you do not. It is unfortunate that something so powerful can be overlooked or dismissed simply because your entertainment factor was not sufficiently engaged. I would suggest you avoid visiting any monument to those who have fallen, served our country in the military or as elected officials, or somehow raised themselves up through actions others would not take and are therefore recognized through some sort of memorial. These places do not usually have a lot of glitz and glam. But by all means, please, continue to enjoy the freedoms that these peoples’ sacrifices have provided and guaranteed for you, including the right to express your opinion.

    Like

  11. Tulasi-Priya says:

    All I can say is that if NOT yelling or throwing garbage or cigarette butt around the site constitutes “respect,” then our standards have sunk pretty low. Actually, they have sunk pretty low. And if you think the appropriate response to soldiers’ death is the freedom to act like a consumerist yahoo (as if you’re a customer at the tomb and the dead soldier’s tomb is the product, or something), then their sacrifice was perhaps made in vain, sad to say. At least as far as some people are concerned.

    Like

  12. kedwards73 says:

    Miss-

    Let me see if I can frame a cogent and unemotional reply.

    Are you familiar with the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier? I won’t belabor it here as there is a wealth of information available.

    Actually, it IS a ceremony. Silence and decorum IS expected. The guard manning this post responds within the framework proscribed and it can be escalated for those who refuse to comply with these standards.

    It is NOT a graveyard. It IS a memorial, with a specific intent.

    There are a myriad of musems, memorials and displays in the DC area where talking, laughter and loud behavior are quite appropriate. This is simply not one of these areas. It is considered hallowed ground. Agree or not, that is how it is treated.

    I would never intentionally disrespect something you felt as sacred. I, and others, would request that same courtesy be extended.

    Like

  13. blujnbabee says:

    My father is buried on the outskirts of Arlington. My friend’s son was killed in Afghanistan and is in Section 60. A special was made by HBO on Section 60, and it broke my heart, even though it was on tv. Respect is ALWAYS expected at this sacred place. To say that running around, laughing really loud, loud conversation, running on the grass, anything but reverence and honoring all that are buried there is nothing less than having zero respect for those who have fallen. To say, or even imply, that laughter and joking around should be accepted is being void of common sense. Look at where you are, look at what the soldiers that guard the tomb have to give up for a year, and understand that you are expected to act in an extremely civil and caring manner. This is, after all, a tomb, just like the Arizona in Hawaii. A burial site is no place to have fun.

    Like

  14. chefjeff.225 says:

    That tomb represemts all the unknown soldiers, buried without markers and unburied, that have defended this country. My father was in the Merchant Marine Service, had two oil tankers sunk out from under him during WWII in the North Atlantic, got on another tanker, and finished the war. It is only by the Grace of God that I exist. That tomb also represents those who perished at sea with no trace. The ultimate respect is required for the ultimate sacrifice of many.

    Like

  15. Helen Powell says:

    The tomb of the unknown soldier is sacred to anyone of sensibility and brains. There are thousands of tourist sites – this is not one of them. Families of missing soldiers come to pay their respects and perhaps pray this is their loved one. When is the last time you heard people laughing and joking at a graveside? You need to pick up a book and educate yourself upon proper conduct. And by the way, the soldiers who guard the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier do so on their own time and without compensation. Unfortunately, you can’t fix stupid and you can’t buy class.

    Like

  16. Al Angulo says:

    Dee82955 ( not sure the lady part applies.) I think you are right. You should probably just go to Disneyland where you can laugh and scratch. The people who go to Arlington cemetery are dead soldiers or live visitors. Visitors never make the rules observed at places they visit. Go break the rules at Disneyland and see how that works out for you.

    Like

  17. richard aylward says:

    You do what you want ladydee82955. You’re the sort of person who always will. You’ve entirely missed the point. When the guard asked for silence, he got it because everyone there really knew that he was correct. If i ever visit this site, I only hope there’s no-one like you there. The sad thing is, you really think you’re right. I’ll say a prayer for you that one day you will see.

    Like

  18. Laura says:

    It’s a grave, not a tourist site. Silence is out of respect for the dead and other mourners who might be present.

    Like

  19. WWII daughter says:

    Yes ladydee82955 you are right. You did miss something here.

    Like

  20. Marcy says:

    Have you ever been to Arlington National Cemetery? Have you seen the thousands and thousands and thousands of white tombstones lined up in perfect formation across the 624 acres that comprise the Cemetery? You may have seen pictures, but pictures do not do this sacred place justice. You only need to hear the 21 guns being fired (and it happened all too often while we were there) to remind visitors of the incredible number of veterans who are being buried there daily. I seem to remember that it’s something like 5,000 per year. This is a place where veterans that served our country are laid to rest. Being anything except respectful and mindful of what this place represents is just disgusting and disappointing. And yes, there are actually signs in the Cemetery (it’s not a park!!) for Silence and Respect. If people can’t control themselves, why are they visiting? Go to the National Mall, there’s lots of space to be ridiculous there.

    Like

  21. A marine says:

    I am a marine and I ask only 1 thing. What makes this site more sacred than all other tombs my brothers and sisters lie in rest? Am I supposed to be quite at my grandfathers grave? Say what u will but I fought for freedom. For everyone’s freedom and let’s remember even here we have freedom of speach so why beat each other up??

    Like

    • ladydee82955 says:

      Thank you, Marine! You said it better than I did, obviously. That’s all I was trying to say! And thank you for your service as well! You hold my utmost respect.

      Like

  22. krishent says:

    I don’t normally post on these types of things. But, I for some reason feel compelled this time. Although I appreciate everyone’s opinion and subjective views, I feel as though this one is just a bit short on reason. Ladydee82955, this IS a ceremony. This is a ceremony to give respect to a person that gave their life to protect our freedom of speech, our right to go to those religious gatherings which you apparently do show respect at. A person that died so we could say those blessing at our kitchen tables before a meal. Why is this different? I guess what I’m having trouble understanding is why you would not WANT to give that respect? As you said, a person travels to the tomb, makes the effort to come, why would they want to then negate that effort but being disrepectful once they’re there? The whole idea of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is not to show respect to the remains in the tomb persay, It’s much bigger than that. It’s to show respect for the millions of soldiers that die and don’t get recognized, that don’t have a face in the news or a name on a monument. Those soldiers that are protecting this country where we have so many freedoms and rights. To show respect is to be reverent, to show someone or something that you are profoundly, solemnly, deeply appreciative for what they did or gave. You asked, are all visitors expected to just silently stand there and “reflect”, YES. Why is the expectation that you’re silent and respectful in your own home at your own table while saying grace, but not at a national momunent and sacred tomb? There is a time and place for talking, joking and laughing, this is not it!

    Like

  23. Yup says:

    It’s a perpetual “ceremony” folks. It’s not an event, it’s not an entertainment venue, it’s not an “attraction;” it’s a solemn and sacred place to respect those who’ve fallen defending our freedom.
    Yes, it is disrespectful to make noise and chat. If you can’t be respectful and quiet, giving the reverence due to the location, then don’t go.

    Like

Comments are closed.